So from my previous post, you may have been wondering which Android I got.

Ta daaaa…

That right, I went against the grain, said no to the Galaxy S3 and the HTC One X, and got myself Google’s Galaxy Nexus. So far I’ve been loving it!

Moving from BlackBerry to Android was certainly a challenge.  It took me a week, maybe two to understand the differences between all the phones available, and how not all Androids looked and acted the same as each other.

It doesn’t help either when Google sells the Galaxy Nexus, made by Samsung, and Samsung sells the Galaxy S1, S2, and now the S3. I thought it was all the same thing for the longest time.

I signed up on the forums over at Android Central, a sister-site of CrackBerry where I normally lurked. There I learned quite a bit within a short amount of time. And it was mostly because of one thread I made that helped me decide between two the most popular Android phones. The Nexus and the S3.

There I had simply asked the Nexus owners, “Do you have G3 envy?” I was surprised to see 43 responses and most of them simply saying “Nope.

What I learned here was that the S3, although a spectacular device that has the tough critics going ga-ga over it, actually had a major draw back to the hardcore Android guys. That is, the operation system (OS) wasn’t pure Android. The S3, as well all other devices not from Google, all have “bloatware”, as well as skins on the OS itself.

The Galaxy Nexus, and the prior model, the Nexus S, are the only phones which have no bloatware or skins. What you see on the screen is pure, 100%, untouched, Android the way Google made it. The second plus, is these phones are also the first to receive the lastest OS updates.

Jelly Bean (version 4.1) was just announced days before I picked up my Galaxy Nexus, and I should be receiving the big update in mid-July. The S3, as well as other Android models will all be months later because the hoops they all have to jump through.

  1. Samsung has to receive the update
  2. Samsung then has to again modify their existing skin (Touch Wiz) to work with the new OS version
  3. Samsung distributes it to the service providers, like Rogers, MTS, and Telus. (Or AT&T, Sprint, etc. if you’re in the U.S.)
  4. The service providers then push the updates to their clients with the phones.
If you think about that, it can be a lot of time and effort to get this. It’s also why many Android phones out there are still on Gingerbread (version 2.x) let alone Ice Cream Sandwich (4.0). FYI, I’m happy to say my phone is running ICS.
I found the biggest compliant against Android has been fragmentation. Owning products straight from Google should help avoid this issue. At least, I sure hope so since I have the phone now. 🙂

So are you aware of Apple putting an injunction on the Galaxy Nexus?

Ya, that was announced literally the next morning after I got the phone! I’m not overly concerned though. People still want it, and it’s still being sold. Google and Samsung have a lot of money too. I’ll let the big boys fight it out and just go from there. I’m not even worried at this point in time.

Still didn’t give Apple a shot?

My wife got an iPhone 4s months ago, and I’ve used iPads everywhere. iOS just doesn’t sit right with me. Too many restrictions. No ability to customize. (And no, I don’t mean just changing the stupid wallpaper.) I like having moving wall papers. I like adding useful widgets. I like being able to have my icons spread out and not forced to be next to each other.

Plus I still don’t want Apple delegating what I can and cannot see with their mobile products. Flash is the biggest example. While I’m fully pro HTML5, I believe old websites should still be seen. I want to see ALL of the internet. Android and BlackBerry both let me do that.

The bigger screen also drew me to Android over iPhone. If I was going to say good bye to my beloved BlackBerry keyboard, I would want the virtual keyboard to be very easy for me. The large screen on the GNexus is perfect for this. I’ve had a much easier time typing on this than I ever did on my wife’s iPhone.

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